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Tips for driving Learners’ Supervisors

Abstract

Based on the NSW road rules, the minimum age to start driving a car is sixteen-year-old. But first you should pass the Knowledge Test after which you are given a ‘learner licence’. Using this licence then you are permitted to drive a car; however, the condition is that a person having a full Australian licence should sit beside you while you are driving. That person is called your ‘Supervising Driver’. If you are twenty-four-year-old or younger you are also given a ‘Learner Driver Logbook’.

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Tips for Learners’ Supervisors
 
Based on the NSW road rules, the minimum age to start driving a car is sixteen-year-old. But first you should pass the Knowledge Test after which you are given a ‘learner licence’. Using this licence then you are permitted to drive a car; however, the condition is that a person having a full Australian licence should sit beside you while you are driving. That person is called your ‘Supervising Driver’. If you are twenty-four-year-old or younger you are also given a ‘Learner Driver Logbook’.
Choosing a supervising driver; Your supervising driver may be a family member or a friend, or a licensed driving instructor. It may be beneficial for you to obtain the services of a professional driving instructor at various stages during the learning process. A person who receives money or any other reward for teaching you to drive must hold a driving instructor’s licence.
3 for 1 structured lesson; Learner drivers who complete a one-hour structured driving lesson with a fully licenced driving instructor can record three hours driving experience in their log book. A maximum of 10 one-hour structured lesson can be accepted and recorded in the ‘Learner Log Book’ for up to 30 hours. Any more than 10 one-hour lessons can only be recorded as actual driving time.
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Twelve tips for better learner supervision 

when you are working with your learner driver
  1. If either you or the learner driver is tired, upset or stressed, reschedule the practice session to another time.
  2. Try frequent, short practice sessions in the beginning.
  3. Use the ‘Learner driver log book’ task key points and learning content as a guide to practice sessions.
  4. Begin with the easiest tasks then, once they have been mastered, move to the more difficult tasks.
  5. Discuss then demonstrate new tasks before getting the learner to attempt them.
  6. Use ‘commentary driving’- which involves the driver and passenger talking about what is happening inside and outside the vehicle.
  7. Start the learner practicing on quite streets, preferably in daylight, before moving onto busier roads and more challenging conditions.
  8. Allow the learner to proceed at his or her own pace.
  9. Don’t criticise mistakes. Calmly discuss what happened and allow the learner to try again.
  10. Be positive and offer praise when the learner successfully completes a task.
  11. Impress upon the learner the importance of developing a sensitivity to speed. It is important that they realise that the faster a vehicle travels, the more difficult it becomes to respond to potential hazards. They should also realise that the faster a vehicle is travelling when involved in a crash, the more devastating the outcome.
  12. Avoid using the radio, mobile phone or talking to other passengers while the learner is practicing.

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